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List of American Groups


Displaying 151 - 200 of 589 items.


Dinning Sisters

The Dinnings were a musical family of nine children, all of whom started singing harmony in church, and then spent their Sunday afternoons singing for fun. Three of the sisters, twins Jean and Ginger and sister Lou, started to win amateur singing contests before the age of ten, and later began to perform with older brother Ace's orchestra. With little experience but a lot of ambition, the young ladies left their Oklahoma hometown and traveled to Chicago, where they auditioned for NBC radio. They were hired and remained for seven years, and ultimately became the highest paid radio act in the Windy City.

The group underwent a few lineup changes over the years (Lou was replaced in 1946 by Jayne Bundesen, who was in turn replaced by Tootsie Dinning in 1952), but their albums for Capitol sold consistently well, including their debut release Songs by the Dinning Sisters which held the top spot on the charts for 18 weeks. Marriages and children eventually demanded the act's attentions, but the family remained involved in music, from Jean Dinning writing the song "Teen Angel" to the sisters' nephew Dean playing bass for alterna-rockers Toad the Wet Sprocket. In 1988, Collectors Choice released an outstanding collection of the Dinning Sisters greatest hits, which is well worth checking out.


Dis Moi

'Dis Moi' is a powerfully soulful A Cappella trio of women (Samantha Keller, Tamar Fogel and Heather Houston), who enchant their audiences with songs sung straight from the heart! Their musical repertoire incorporates a wide range of styles from around the globe, as well as inspired originals, with themes of love, hope, healing and unity. 'Dis Moi' means 'tell me' in French, and reflects the members' belief and hope that their music will open people to expressing themselves as they feel called. As a visionary trio, they feel that their calling is to be an integral part of the healing movement of the planet. Their radiance is intoxicating, as they shine their deep love for one another, for their music, and for humanity as a whole; inspiring the crowd to open their hearts to the healing harmonies. Their thought provoking lyrics, and grounded words of wisdom, uplift spirits, stir souls, and inspire movement in consciousness. This is not your typical A Cappella music. Let the harmonies of these lovely women take you on a journey of heart, mind and soul as they weave their voices in a unique tapestry of spirited song.


Dixie Hummingbirds

The Dixie Hummingbirds are probably the best known of the black gospel quartets, having performed for over 50 years throughout America and Europe. They became the inspiration for countless R&B and soul singers, from Jackie Wilson and Clyde McPhatter to Bobby "Blue" Bland and The Temptations.

The group was formed in Greenville, South Carolina, by James Davis in 1928, a year before the Great Depression. The members were Barney Gipson (lead), Davis (tenor), Barney Parks (baritone), and J.B. Matterson (bass). In their early teens they sang in the Bethel Church of God in the junior chorus. Soon Fred Owens became the bass and the group became the Sterling High School Quartet. Davis changed the name to the Dixie Hummingbirds.


Dorothy Love Coates & The Original Gospel Harmonettes

Dorothy Love Coates was a composer ("I'm Holding", "Every Day Will Be Sunday"). She was also leading The (Original) Gospel Harmonettes, a female aggregation, who sang Gospel songs.

In fact, this group was formed in 1940, and its first members were Mildred Madison Miller, Odessa Glasgow Edwards, Vera Conner Kolls, Willie M. Brooks Newberry and their composer was Evelyn Starks.

The first recording of this group was in 1949, without Dorothy Love Coates, who started her recording with the (Original) Gospel Harmonettes in 1951.

In the middle 1950s, the group was composed of D. Love, M. Miller, W. Newberry, V. Kolls, O. Edwards, with Herbert "Pee Wee" Pickard, piano. Their records were under the labels Victor, Speciality, Nashboro, Andex and Savoy.


Down 4 The Count

Down 4 The Count began in 2003, when six CSU Northridge students in the University's vocal jazz ensemble found they shared a common interest: wanting to sing ensemble vocal jazz without those pesky instrumentalists: in other words, A Cappella! Since that time, Down 4 The Count has won multiple awards (including three song-arrangement awards and 1st place at the 2009 San Diego A Cappella Competition) and they have performed at venues all over the greater Los Angeles and San Diego area, including the Jazz Bakery, The Coach House, The Coffee Gallery Backstage, San Diego IndieFest, and many more. They have opened for both Rockapella and for Sixthwave. Their debut album, released in 2008, is for sale at Singers.com, on iTunes, Amazon, and probably several more. Although the group line-up has changed significantly since its inception, D4TC still features original arrangements with a distinctly jazz flavor.


Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver

The gospel music that we record and perform on stage has always been important to me. Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver have made many more gospel recordings than secular ones. It is apparent to me that the folks who buy our music and come to our concerts feel, as I do, that there is no better message than the message of Jesus Christ. On the first Sunday of May, in 1985, I rededicated my life to our Lord Jesus. It is my fervent hope that my "musical mission" will lead others to Him.

As far back as I can remember, I loved the sound of music. Just about everyone listened to The Grand Ole Opry, and our family was no exception. Though I listened to all the stars on the Opry, the group that impressed me most was Bill Monroe and His Blue Grass Boys. His music was different, more intense. High lonesome is the term we used for it. I could hardly wait for Saturday nights to arrive so I could listen. I decided early on that I wanted to play that kind of music.


Drifters

Formed in 1953 in New York, USA, at the behest of Atlantic Records, this influential R&B vocal group was initially envisaged as a vehicle for ex-Dominoes singer Clyde McPhatter (Clyde Lensley McPhatter, 15 November 1932, Durham, North Carolina, USA, d. 13 June 1972, New York City, New York, USA). Gerhart Thrasher, Andrew Thrasher and Bill Pinkney (b. 15 August 1925, Dalzell, South Carolina, USA, d. 4 July 2007, Daytona Beach, Florida, USA) completed the new quartet which, as Clyde McPhatter and the Drifters, achieved a million-selling number 1 R&B hit with their debut single, 'Money Honey'. Follow-up releases, including 'Such A Night' (number 5 R&B), 'Lucille' (number 7 R&B) and 'Honey Love' (a second chart-topper), also proved highly successful, while the juxtaposition of McPhatter's soaring tenor against the frenzied support of the other members provided a link between gospel and rock 'n' roll styles. The leader's interplay with bass player Pinkey was revelatory, but McPhatter's induction into the armed forces in 1954 was a blow that the Drifters struggled to withstand.


East Carolina University Chamber Singers

Because of the more demanding rehearsal and performance schedule, the 32-36 voice Chamber Singers invites only the most gifted and passionate choristers from ECU to be amongst its ranks. Designed to perform twentieth-century a cappella repertoire at a professional level, this ensemble also delves into the repertoire of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries on a biannual basis in order to present baroque masterworks using historically informed performance practices in collaboration with ECU's Early Music Ensemble. The televised performances of G. F. Handel's complete Messiah performed on original instruments in the spring of 2003 attracted impressive audiences and earned rave reviews. The Chamber Singers, most of whom are voice majors from within the School of Music, tour annually and received a standing ovation for their performance at the 2002 NC-ACDA conference in Greensboro, NC. The Chamber Singers will combine with the University Chorale and the ECU Symphony Orchestra to perform at the 2003 Fall NCMEA Conference in Winston-Salem.


Eclipse

Eclipse is a vocal group of six creating explosive sound, driving rhythms, and lush harmonies using only one instrument: the human mouth.

The six members of Eclipse originally met while performing in a public relations /ambassador-oriented group that was part of the department of Programs and Entertainment at Utah State University. They began by arranging their own vocal covers of popular songs and performing them on campus and in the Logan area. Increasing public interest and performance opportunities led to the recording of their first album, "Once," which was released in April 2001.


Edlos

The EDLOS, you might ask? Four guys who sing without instrumental accompaniment... A Cappella. What's with the name? The story they tell is that the name is an acronym for Excessive Decibel Levels from Outer Space and that they're refugees from the planet "A" which circles the star Capella in the constellation Auriga. The story goes on, but let's cut to reality here for a minute. These four classically trained guys; Eric, Larry, Ed, and Craig were destined to take their schooling, talent, and juicy voices into the 21st century, always breaking new ground in their never ending pursuit of A Cappella diversity and originality. Speaking of diversity, the EDLOS have three shows to offer. Their critically acclaimed Popourri Show, which consistently draws standing ovations, is made up of eclectic originals and familiar favorites.


elmo THUMM

Once upon a time, the greatest acappella group in the Midwest was a buzz in the ears of Milford, MI.

From 1998 - 2010, elmoTHUMM wowed audiences with their aggressive sound, rich arrangements, and energy, They won countless contests, accepted awards, played for Presidents and royalty, filled TV screens, and worked their way into the hearts of kids and parents throughout the country. We miss them.

In 2010, their personal schedules and goals conflicted and eT was unable to appear at quite a few gigs, so the group was forced to disband. BUT...Greg, Adam and Jason have recently begun singing together again and hatching schemes for 2 new members...word is the group will be called THUMMp. Cool.


Emmanuel Quartet

The Emmanuel Quartet is an acappella gospel group that has been singing since 1993. In 1997 the quartet won a national talent competition in Jackson, TN. The group has toured throughout the United States and in 2007 sang for 12,000 people in Jakarta, Indonesia for evangelistic meetings. In June of 2009 the quartet participated in an evangelistic effort in Silang, Cavite, Philippines. The quartet has released five albums independently and in 2010 completed our sixth project titled "Hymns - By the Book II."

From the very beginning, The Emmanuel Quartet has always kept a vision in mind of what the Lord would have us to do. God has brought four men from out of the world to minister to His people in a time when ministry has been used for personal gain and not for His glory. We feel that it is important for our group to live what we share with others. The members of the quartet are not only musicians by desire but are ministers of the gospel through music. Phillip, Joey, Tim, and Ryan are committed to spreading the news of Christ's soon return.


Encounters

The Encounters originated in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn, mid 1963. By the end of the year they had a recording contract with Swan Records and recorded an original, "Don't Stop", written by Joe Venneri (Tokens)& Billy Carlucci (Billy & the Essentials). From 1963 to 1979 the group entertained in the Laurel's Country Club,The NY Hilton and the Friars Club as well as hundreds of corporate and private affairs.

They have appeared with and have opened shows for Earl Lewis & the Channels, Speedo & The Cadillacs, Arlene Smith & the Chantels, Lenny Coco & The Chimes, The Duprees, Randy & The Rainbows, The Emotions, The Devotions, The Dubs, Larry Chance & The Earls, Freddie Scott, Johnny Maestro & The Brooklyn Bridge, Emil Stucchio & the Classics, The Jive Five, The Passions, The Fireflies, The Harptones, The Monotones, Vito Piccone & the Elegants, The Five Discs , the Quotations, Kenny Vance and the Planotones, The Legends of DooWop and The Temptations.


Ernie Haase & Signature Sound

Ernie Haase & Signature Sound are a young group of Gospel singers that reach a very wide age group. Their style is hip and fresh, but the music is Old School Gospel, reminiscent of the great quartets of old like The Statesmen Quartet, The Cathedral Quartet, along with black gospel artists like The Golden Gate Quartet. However, their presentation is new and fresh and very polished! Young and old alike are drawn to them.

They have topped the Billboard Video Chart many times and have won numerous Dove Awards from the Gospel Music Association.

The founder Ernie Haase sings tenor and was a part of the famous Cathedral Quartet throughout the 90's until they retired in 1999. As a member of the Cathedrals, Ernie was inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame in the mid 1990's and nominated for many Grammy Awards. Rounding out EHSS are Doug Anderson, Devin McGlamery, and Ian Owens.

They tour 120 dates a year. 50 of those dates they tour with legendary Hall of Fame song writer and singer Bill Gaither.


Excalibur

In 1995 and 1997-2001, Excalibur placed in the finals in the International competition for the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America, Inc., SPEBSQSA , -- one of the ten best quartets in the world! Excalibur won the LOL District competition in 1991 and is the highest ranking quartet from LOL since Happiness Emporium won the gold medal in 1975.


F'loom

F'loom is an avant cappella vocal trio that presents cutting-edge programs of "language music" - original pieces that inhabit the fertile, mysterious realm that lies between pure language (speech) and pure music (song). F'loom performs original all-vocal compositions seething with satire, social commentary, pop diatribe, slap, zap, melody, poetry, and comedy.


Face

Face is a nationally recognized all-vocal rock band from Boulder, Colorado, bringing a new edge and attitude to the human voice. Using just five voices and a vocal drummer, or "beat-boxer," Face creates a rock-music phenomenon that has to be seen to be believed. No other instruments or special effects - just six guys. Considered "among the top 10 singing groups in the country," (Norm Johnson, Las Vegas Leisure Guide) they regularly wow sold-out audiences throughout Colorado, including such classic venues as Boulder Theater and The Soiled Dove.

Face was recently named "Best Local Musician/Group" by Boulder Weekly's 2009 Best of Boulder Reader Survey. In addition, Face is a two-time winner of the National Audience Favorite Award at the Harmony Sweepstakes National Finals, as well as National Runner-Up in 2005 and 2007. Face was also runner-up for Favorite Pop/Rock Group in the 2007 Contemporary A Cappella Society's Community Awards. Face has been headlining in Las Vegas periodically since 2007 to rave reviews, paving the way for even more national attention.


Fairfield Four

The Fairfield Four, the most distinguished proponents of traditional African American a cappella gospel singing working today, were organized in 1921 by Reverend J.R. Carrethers, assistant pastor of the Fairfield Baptist Church in Nashville, Tennessee. The group, initially a trio comprised of the Reverend's two sons, baritone Harold and bass Rufus along with tenor lead John Battle, evolved into a quartet with the addition of a second lead, Lattimer Green, later replaced by Samuel McCrary.

The quartet sang a cappella, performing traditional spirituals such as "Ezekiel Saw the Wheel" and "Dry Bones" arranged and taught to them by Reverend Carrethers. In time, the Fairfield Four became professionals with Rufus Carrethers and Samuel McCrary emerging as singers of reputation, Carrethers for his rhythmic style of bass singing, and McCrary for his exceptional clear tenor voice.


Fanatix

Fanatix quartet consists of Connie Noble, tenor (past international champion with The 4th Edition and Savvy and long time tenor of High Society); Darcy Newell, lead; Sandy Shelver, baritone (past international champion with High Society); and Gerry Papageorge, bass (past international champion (tenor) with Panache). They formed in the summer of 1998 when this kid from New Mexico and a big shot tenor and baritone finally convinced another legendary tenor/lead to make bass her new mission. They earned 4th place at their first regional contest (the highest they ever got!) and earned a wild card slot to international. They were thrilled to sing their way into 4th place at our first international contest in Atlanta in 1999! (This was Darcy's first international medal, and Gerry became the first Sweet Adeline ever to earn international medals in 3 different voice parts: lead, tenor, and bass).


femme m'amie

This highly acclaimed a cappella group, whose name means "woman, my friend," will perform selections from their diverse repertoire, including Shaker music. Sharing a woman's view of the world, femme m'amie delights audiences with their pitch perfect harmonies, full arrangements, and simple elegance.


Fermata Town

Founded in 2009, Fermata Town is now the newest member of the Contemporary A Cappella League (CAL). Inspired by the wealth of new talent in the a cappella world, we have worked hard to find our voice and put a unique stamp on the Boston a cappella scene. We pride ourselves in our original arrangements, the sound that we produce, and our ability to maintain a healthy balance between our music and active lifestyles.

Fermata Town was officially founded during the spring of 2009 stemming from the break up of the all male Boston based group The Testostertones (Boston). The founding duo of Dan Campagna and John Baptista recruited former Testostertones Dave Carr and Nathan Pierce to join forces and find other interested singers who shared the same passion for a cappella music. Be it through word or mouth, internet advertisements and craigslist posts - Fermata Town was able to quickly establish itself as one of Boston's freshest co-ed a cappella groups to hit the streets.


Fifth Avenue

Fifth Avenue is a bright, fresh, musical group - mostly because they don't know any better. They hit the scene in June of 1983 and dazzled audiences with their tight, pure harmonies and delightful sense of fun. Within a year they were appearing before 45,000 people in a two-hour concert at the Spokane World's Fair Park. They have also worked with such artists as Bill Cosby and Jerry Lee Lewis, and did a tour to Japan and China aboard the Royal Viking Star cruse ship.

After three great years they decided to take a bit of a hiatus. So they did...for nine years. This hiatus involved starting families, establishing private businesses, doing the 9 to 5 routine, entering and exiting a witness protection program, etc., but each member continued to develop his musical chops. But hey! Now, The Ave is back together and they're more fuel efficient, economical, and they have more RAM. Recently, Fifth Avenue has performed for enthusiastic audiences at the Boise State jazz festival, the Casper College jazz festival, the Frank DeMiero Jazz Camp and the 1998 International Association of Jazz Educators conference. They also had the pleasure of performing at the 1999 Boise Summer Riverfest, in concert with a jazz big band. Their audience included over 100,000 listeners in attendance, as well as countless more watching on live television. Between these engagements they've performed at colleges, conventions, and a couple of places that they'd rather not talk about.


First Call

The Christian a cappella group, First Call, have reinvigorated the familiar Christmas classics with fresh arrangements and sincere renditions of the old favorites. Appearances by guest vocalists and multi-tracking allow for a multiplicity of textures and sounds. "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" will rekindle good will toward all in even the most cynical holiday Grinch. "The New Twelve Days of Christmas" replaces the partridge and pear tree with shopping malls and choir rehearsals, and segues brilliantly into "We Wish You a Merry Christmas." The shimmering, pure vocal tones are augmented by the crisp, digital production. This is an "Evening" you won't want to miss!


Fisk Jubilee Singers

On November 16, 1871, a group of unknown singers -- all but two of them former slaves and many of them still in their teens -- arrived at Oberlin College in Ohio to perform before a national convention of influential ministers. After a few standard ballads, the chorus began to sing spirituals -- "Steal Away" and other songs" associated with slavery and the dark past, sacred to our parents," as soprano Ella Sheppard recalled. It was one of the first public performances of the secret music African Americans had sung in fields and behind closed doors.

The Jubilees not only introduced the world to the music of black America, they championed the liberties of all Americans," says Andrew Ward, co-writer of the documentary and author of "Dark Midnight When I Rise: The Story of the Jubilee Singers." More than 125 years later, the Jubilee Singers of Fisk University continue the concert tradition begun by that courageous original chorus of former slaves.


Five Blind Boys of Alabama

Much in the world has changed since the original version of the Blind Boys of Alabama first raised their voices together. That was in 1939, when the members were just kids at the Alabama Institute for the Negro Blind in Talladega, Ala. Today, more than 70 years later, founding member Jimmy Carter can look back on a career far beyond what he and his colleagues could imagine at that time. The group has won a long list of awards, including Lifetime Achievement honors from the Grammys and the National Endowment for the Arts, entertained around the world, been profiled on 60 Minutes, sung for two Presidents at the White House and been inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame.

Though the group has recorded and performed with a few country artists, along with others as diverse as Ben Harper, Tom Petty, Peter Gabriel and Prince, they never crossed the line and committed to doing a project inspired by the country genre until now, with the release of Take The High Road on Saguaro Road Records. This landmark recording draws from modern and traditional country to enrich the group's gospel-rooted sound with fresh and illuminating insight.


Five By Design

Five By Design's signature harmonies have withstood the test of time in a career that stands out on America's musical landscape, spanning more than fifteen years. This nationally-acclaimed vocal quintet has been the choice of symphony orchestras and performing art centers delighting hundreds of thousands.

But Five By Design's creative talents go far beyond their vocal prowess. As the creative talent behind Radio Days, Club Swing, and Stay Tuned, their productions showcase the group's penchant for storytelling and the comedic. Whether backed by symphony orchestra or studio big band, Five By Design embraces the unforgettable melodies, lush harmonies, and swinging rhythms that evoke the names of Miller, Mancini and Mercer.


Five Discs

The Five Discs were one of several doo-wop groups (Carollons, Chips, etc.) to trace their origins to the Bedford-Stuyvesant district of Brooklyn, New York, USA. They were formed in 1954 by Joe Brocco (lead), Joe Barsalona (baritone), Paul Albano (first tenor) and Tony Basile (second tenor). Composed of Italian-descended young men and originally titled the Flames, they subsequently shuffled the pack by adding black singers Mario deAndrade and Andrew Jackson from the Love Notes. This produced a new line-up of deAndrade (lead), Jackson (bass), Albano (first tenor), Basile (second tenor) and Barsalona (baritone), though membership remained fluid over ensuing years. After recording demos at Bell Sound studios in New York the group started to offer these to interested parties. There were no takers until songwriter Billy Martin introduced them to the proprietors of the Emge Records label. They were still titled the Flames when they cut deAndrade's song "I Remember", but when it was released they had chosen a new name, the Five Discs.


Five O'Clock Shadow

Five O'Clock Shadow, the all-vocal rock band from Boston, is living proof that a band without instruments can still rock! Using the same tech wizardry that guitarists have been using since the dawn of rock, Dan, Oren, Paul, and Caleb morph their voices into shredding guitar riffs and soaring solos right before your very ears. Meanwhile, their one-man vocal rhythm section, Stack, lays down his "beatbass": mouth beats and vocal bass thundering forth from his face, both at the same time! Yet when you take away all the speakers, amps, and microphones, these guys are still singers right down to the soul!

Also known as "FOCS", Five O'Clock Shadow has vocally rocked audiences of all ages throughout the US and Japan, and in every kind of venue. Through their educational program FOCS has presented workshops and concerts to thousands of music students from coast to coast.


Flamingos

Cousins Jacob Carey (Jake) and Ezikial Carey (Zeke) formed the group in Chicago, Illinois, after meeting Paul David Wilson and Johnny Carter at a black Jewish church. Earl Lewis soon joined, and after a series of name changes (The Swallows, El Flamingos, The Five Flamingos) wound up being known as The Flamingos. Sollie McElroy soon replaced Lewis (who joined The Five Echoes). Their first single (for Chance Records), "If I Can't Have You", was a moderate success, and the follow-ups "That's My Desire" and "Golden Teardrops" cemented their reputation. They left Chance Records sometime after their December 1953 session and signed with DJ Al Benson's Parrot Records. Sollie McElroy was on their first Parrot session, but left the group in December 1954, to be replaced by first tenor Nate Nelson (who was on their second Parrot session; he's lead on "I'm Yours," released in January 1955). In early 1955, the Flamingos transferred over to Chess Records, to record for their Checker subsidiary. They started to have national R&B hits in 1956 ("I'll Be Home," "A Kiss From Your Lips," "The Vow," "Would I Be Crying"), but both Zeke Carey and Johnny Carter were drafted (Johnny in September). They were also part of the 1956 Alan Freed movie Rock, Rock, Rock.


Fleur-de-Lisa

Fleur de Lisa is based in Durham, North Carolina. They write and perform original a cappella music, often based on poetry. Individually they bring many disciplines together, including jazz, rock, classical and country. Their diverse musical experiences blend into a versatile style of their own. Individually they bring many disciplines together, including jazz, rock, classical and country. They use all these experiences when they create their unique music. They have performed in Atlanta, Pittsburgh, throughout NC and the Eastern US.


Florida Boys

For sixty years fans have flocked to see The Florida Boys, the only male quartet that was consistently prominent from the 1950's to July 2007. With No. 1 hits like "Standing On The Solid Rock", "When He Was On The Cross, I Was On His Mind", "Lead Me To The Altar" and "I Lean On You Lord" this legendary group has recorded some 100 albums and attained a following of devoted listeners.

So what is at the heart of their success? Les Beasley, who sang lead and served as manager of the group, says it's their commitment to the calling they each have. We sincerely believe we have been doing what we were put on earth to do. We wanted our audiences to have a good time but it was most important that they hear the message in each song.

The Florida Boys' national television appearances consist of "The Today Show", "TNN's Prime Time Country", "Crooke & Chase", "Gaither Homecoming Videos" and their own "Gospel Singing Jubilee" which they hosted for many years.


Flying Without Instruments

Emily grew up singing folksongs on family roadtrips and coercing her cousins into impromptu choruses. After realizing coercion was a poor foundation for an ensemble, Emily joined the Contra Costa Children's Chorus, where she now sits on the board of directors. She went on to major in music at Pomona College, winning the President's Prize in Women's Studies for her lecture-recital on music by women composers from Clara Schumann to Margaret Bonds . After a couple of stints abroad, Emily joined the only theater group with its own law school, the Georgetown Gilbert & Sullivan Society, where she still moonlights occasionally as a second violin. During her law school days, Emily learned that the average time in a refugee camp is 17 years; in response, she founded Asylum Access, a refugee human rights organization that has improved human rights for over 500,000 refugees in Africa, Asia and Latin America under Emily's leadership. Despite loving her job, her fantastic husband, and life in SF, Emily couldn't help feeling something was missing from her life ... until she found FWIdom in 2009. (She still feels something may be missing -- she thinks it's called "sanity" -- but takes solace in the fact that she's now in good company.)


Fontane Sisters

The line-up of this close-harmony 50s US vocal group, whose initial success was achieved by making cover versions of black R&B records, comprised Marge Rosse (New Milford, New Jersey, USA; lead), Bea Rosse (b. New Milford, New Jersey, USA; low harmony) and Geri Rosse (b. New Milford, New Jersey, USA; harmony). Their mother was a choral director and organist. After leaving high school they joined an all-girl troupe and went on an eight-month tour. Later, they were joined by their brother Frank on guitar, and appeared on radio and in theatres and clubs. After Frank was killed in World War II, the girls re-formed in 1944 as a trio and worked for several years on Perry Como's radio and television shows; they also backed him on several records, including the US number 1 hits 'You're Adorable' and 'Hoop-Dee-Doo'. Signed to RCA - Victor Records in 1949, they had several minor hits in the early 50s, including 'Tennessee Waltz', 'Let Me In' (with Texas Jim Robertson) and 'Cold, Cold Heart'.


Footnotes

Footnotes started in High school under the direction of Ben Ayling (bass of the Ritz) in 2001/02. The next two years Gary Lewis (tenor of Platinum and Bari of Max Q) replaced Ben as choir director and became their new coach. They competed in both the Young Women in Harmony Regional Competition and the JAD high school competition winning Gold in both. In 2006 they won the Sweet Adelines' Rising Star Quartet.

Group Members - Tenor - Erica Wagner, Lead - Heather Pase, Bari - Lindsay Sanderson, Bass - Loren Kaminski


Forefront

Forefront Quartet formed in August of 2009. Since then, this quartet has enjoyed success at international barbershop competitions by placing 13th in 2010, 6th in 2011, and 7th in 2012! They were also named the 2010 and 2013 Cardinal District Quartet of the Year. They won the 2010 Cardinal District Quartet Championship and of over 300 district quartet competitors from around the nation, they finished with the highest score. In 2013 they won a 5th place bronze medal for their contest performances in Toronto.

Quickly becoming one of the Barbershop Harmony Society's most sought-after quartets, they pride themselves in providing their audiences with great music, artistry, and performance energy!


Four Aces

One of the most successful pre-rock vocal groups, the Four Aces did well during the early '50s with a narrow range of pop material but burned out before decade's end. Founded by Navy shipmates Al Alberts and Dave Mahoney, the act added Lou Silvestri and Sol Vaccaro before making a name for themselves around their native Philadelphia. After failing to find a distributor for their debut single "(It's No) Sin," Alberts founded his own Victoria label to release the single. It became a big hit in late 1951 and sold a million copies. Signed to Decca before the end of the year, their debut single for the label, "Tell Me Why," just barely missed the top of the charts and sold a million copies as well. A few Top Ten hits followed during the early '50s before the theme to Three Coins in the Fountain hit number one in 1954. Another movie theme, "Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing," spent over a month at the top during 1955.


Four Bettys

The Four Bettys are the 2008 Sweet Adelines International Champion Quartet. With a combined 40+ years singing and numerous national and international awards, they share a passion for performing. The Bettys just love an audience, and have enjoyed a wide variety of performance situations including concerts, barbershop chapter shows, special events, serenades, or even drive-by singings. The Bettys have sung for audiences in Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Nevada, Kansas, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Florida, Canada, Maryland and can soon be seen in Oregon, California and Hawaii. Last May, the Bettys had the rare honor of headlining a show at the Kennedy Center for Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.


Four Coins

Formed in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, USA, in 1952, the vocal harmony group the Four Coins consisted of George Mantalis, James Gregorakis and brothers George and Michael Mahramas. Originally the quartet were horn players in an orchestra with Bobby Vinton, who was an unknown at the time. At the end of 1952 the foursome began harmonizing together, and in January 1953 appeared on an 'amateur hour' radio programme, which they won. They left Vinton in 1953 and began a residency at a Pittsburgh club called the Blue Ridge Inn, naming themselves the Four Keys.

They recorded their first singles in November 1953 for Corona Records, which led to a contract with Epic Records, a branch of the larger Columbia Records. Taking their cue from another quartet, the Four Aces, the group changed its name to the Four Coins. The group's first Epic single, 'We'll Be Married (In The Church In The Wildwood)', sold well but it was not until 1957 that they recorded their biggest hit, 'Shangri-La', which reached number 11 in the US charts and earned a gold record. The group had charted seven times by 1959. In 1960 they changed labels to MGM Records and continued to record for Jubilee Records, Vee Jay Records and Roulette Records, undergoing personnel changes along the way. They disbanded in 1970.


Four Freshmen

The Four Freshmen were one of the top vocal groups of the 1950s, and formed the bridge between '40s ensembles like Mel-Tones and harmony-based rock & roll bands such as the Beach Boys as well as groups like Spanky & Our Gang and the Manhattan Transfer. The group's roots go back to the end of the 1940s and a barbershop quartet-influenced outfit called Hal's Harmonizers, organized at the Arthur Jordan Conservatory of Butler University in Indiana by two brothers, Ross and Don Barbour. Their repertoire centered on standards such as "Moonglow" and "The Christmas Song," and they began to show an unusually free, improvisational approach to their harmony singing. A couple of membership changes brought Bob Flanigan, a cousin, into the fold alongside Hal Kratzsch, and suddenly the Four Freshmen were assembled in all but name, and that fell into place a little later.


Four King Cousins

The Four King Cousins are daughters of the famous King Sisters and members of the equally famous King Family.

The four young women, all pretty blondes in their early 20s, first appeared on TV on John Davidson's "Kraft Summer Music Hall".

Then they were signed to a Capitol recording contract, appeared on top shows like Jonathan Winters and Johnny Carson, and in concert with Buddy Rich, Buddy Greco and Stan Getz.

"Introducing" was their debut album, 11 heavily-accompanied pop covers, including a pair by Burt Bacharach, a pair by Lennon/McCartney, Brian Wilson's "God Only Knows" and other pop hits. Innocent, schmaltzy, nostalgic, top-40 fun from the late 60s!


Four Preps

The clean-cut West Coast-based Four Preps are best remembered for a string of Top 100 hits during the late '50s and early '60s, including "Twenty Six Miles (Santa Catalina)," "Big Man," "Down by the Station," "Lazy Summer Night," "Got a Girl," "It Ain't Never," "Moon River," "Lollipops and Roses," "My Special Angel," and others. Ultimately, the Four Preps' biggest influence can be heard via their impact on Brian Wilson, whose harmony-driven production for the Beach Boys was a direct antecedent of the Four Preps' sound.


Four Renegades

Formed in 1956, the Four Renegades slowly rose in International competitions until winning it all by 450 points in Boston, 1965. At that point they were: Bass, Tom Felger, Baritone, Jim Foley, Lead, Ben Williams and Tenor Buzz Haeger. There are 30 songs, and it's hard to tell who's having more fun, the group or the audience. Want funny? Listen to 'Mr. Bassman.' Poignant? 'The Little Boy.' Rousing? 'Waiting for the Robert E. Lee.' Spiritual? 'The Lord's Prayer.' The Renegades were funny, they sang great, they had class, and they were tremendous barbershop ambassadors. It adds up to a CD that's big fun!


Four Shadow

Four Shadow, the famous a cappella group from Minneapolis, Minnesota, performs for crowds across the nation, singing over 150 shows a year in over 40 states for audiences of all ages and musical tastes. In addition to a number of original songs, they perform tunes by artists like the Beatles, Paul Simon, the Dave Matthews Band, and Howie Day. Four Shadow has shared the stage with Huey Lewis, the Persuasions, and Lonestar, and performed live on NBC's "Today" show.

Every Four Shadow show is filled with a winning mix of audience interaction, infectious energy, friendly humor and strong a cappella vocals. One of the nation's hottest a cappella groups, these guys demonstrate beyond a doubt that the most powerful and versatile instrument of all is one which we each possess - the human voice.


Four Statesmen

Members of the Four Statesmen began quartet singing as early as 1945. The first International appearance was in 1964, where they placed twelfth. Following their win in 1967, they kept singing, with appearances on the Mike Douglas TV show and tours that took them as far abroad as England, France and Italy. The 27 songs on this recording include the sentimental - 'Try To Remember,' 'Climb Every Mountain' and ' I Miss You Most Of All' are just a few - as well as the lighthearted: 'I've Got The Time, I've Got The Place, But It's Hard To Get The Girl' and 'Crazy Bones Skeleton Ball.' Our favorite: 'Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head,' with a beautifully-harmonized refrain.


Four Tunes

The Four Tunes, like many African-American groups of the 40s and early 50s, were a pop rather than a R&B ensemble. The group had its origin in the Brown Dots, and was formed by Ivory 'Deek' Watson (18 July 1909, Mounds, Illinois, USA, d. 4 November 1969, Washington, DC, USA) after he first fell out with the rest of the Ink Spots in November 1944. The other members of the original Brown Dots line-up were Pat Best (b. William Best, 6 June 1923, Wilmington, North Carolina, USA, d. 14 October 2004, Roseville, California, USA; baritone), Jimmy Gordon (bass) and Joe King (first tenor), although the latter was quickly replaced by Jimmy Nabbie (b. USA, d. September 1992). While still with the Brown Dots, Best, Gordon and Nabbie left Watson and joined with second tenor Danny Owens in 1946 to record on the Manor label as the Sentimentalists, changing their name shortly afterwards to the Four Tunes.


Four Vagabonds

The Four Vagabonds were radio stars of the early and mid 1940s. As 50's vocal harmony lovers will tell you, the Four Vagabonds are grandfathers of R&B harmony. Their 1946 Apollo recording sessions links them to R&B recording history. Surprisingly, many educated black music fans are completely unaware of the Vagabonds. They sang popular songs, which some blues-oriented listeners may find challenging. Regardless of the repertoire, the Four Vagabonds were expert practitioners of improvisational harmony singing. The balance of their harmony is an extraordinary thing, the evenness of the four voices. The singers' pitch is exceptionally accurate, especially lead vocalist John Jordan. The Four Vagabonds' mastery of "barbershop chord" construction is evident in many stunning touches, most particularly the "instrumental choruses," which add another dimension to the Four Vagabonds' art. Objectively, their horn imitations is impressive not because it sounds so much like a brass band, but because the Vagabonds manage to make it gorgeous beyond description.


Four Voices

In 1993, when Bradley High School students, Chad and Brandon Guyton, attended a Harmony Explosion presentation, they had no idea what lay ahead. A few years later, they recruited two fellow Lee University musicians, Lester Rector and Jayson VanHook, to form Four Voices. Contrary to popular belief, the "Four Voices" name was not inspired from the obvious, that is the requirement to fulfill the prerequisites of a quartet. Actually, these young men met in the Voices of Lee, a 16-member vocal orchestra group at Lee University, where they contributed four of the eight men's voices to make a unique, harmonious sound that has gained international recognition.


Fred

Born in 1908 in Kankakee, Illinois, Fred was named after his father, Fred. Despite his early love of music, he would soon become internationally adored as a star of both the small and silver screens as well as the visual inspiration for one of America's most cherished comic book icons. In fact... oops. Wrong Fred. Sorry.

Fred (the barbershop quartet, not that other guy) was formed in 1991 when four members of Marietta, Georgia's Big Chicken Chorus decided that they were better without all the extra dead weight. Many audiences and professional coaches would argue that were probably wrong.

Seeking a name for the newly formed quartet, the four plucky members spent an hour discussing possibilities before they all became too tired and disgusted with one another to continue. Fed up with all the great possibilities, they compromised on the name "Fred," thereby proving Andrew Carnegie's maxim that "strong men don't compromise."


Fred Waring and his Pennsylvanians

One of the enduring images of the 1920s is of the college boy in a raccoon coat, out for some jazz kicks with a hip flask and a flapper on his arm. Waring's Pennsylvanians popularized this type of image through their music, stage shows, and film appearances. The band was formed in 1918 at Pennsylvania State University by the brothers Fred and Tom Waring, and their friends Freddy Buck and Poley McClintock.

They first billed themselves as the Waring-McClintock Snap Orchestra and then became Waring's Banjo Orchestra before adopting the name of Waring's Pennsylvanians in 1922. In 1923 they had a big hit with the record Sleep and the song continued to be the band's theme song for many years to come.


Fretless

Fretless made its debut in June of 1999 at the First Parish Unitarian Church in Bedford, MA. In 2004, we competed at the Eastern Regional Harmony Sweepstakes at Tufts University's Cohen Auditorium, winning third place. In 2005, we produced our first CD entitled "All the Things We Are".

Fretless weaves the soprano, alto, tenor, baritone and bass voices of five accomplished performers into a tapestry of lush harmonies and fascinating lyrics. Our repertoire includes an adventurous mix of lively pop songs, Broadway classics, demanding classical works, and off-beat selections from the great American songbook.

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