Singers.com

In Celebration of the Human Voice - The Essential Musical Instrument

Home | Doo Wop | Barbershop | World | Contemporary | Christian | Vocal Jazz | Choral | Christmas | Instructional | Arrangements

List of Choral Directors

This is a list of choral directors whose recordings we carry in our extensive catalog. These choral directors are conductors of the many of the finest choirs performing choral music around the world today. These choir directors are of university, college, community and professional choirs and include a wide variety of styles and genres.


Displaying 201 - 250 of 313 items.


Weston Noble

Weston Noble is an accomplished American music educator and conductor. As Professor Emeritus of Music at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, he is best known for directing the Luther College Nordic Choir and the Luther College Concert Band.

Weston Henry Noble was born in 1922 on a farm just west of Riceville, Iowa, of English parentage. He was raised in the Free Methodist Church and received his early education in a one-room schoolhouse until the eighth grade, then attending Riceville High School. Like many young Iowans with an interest in music at that time, Noble played in the high school band, sang in the choir, and played clarinet solos at state contest.

Though he originally intended to go to the University of Iowa, Noble, through the influence of his father, Merwin Henry Noble, enrolled at Luther College in 1939 at the age of 16. Majoring in history with studies in music, Noble quickly drew the attention of the music faculty because of his talents in conducting. In his second year he began leading rehearsals. He did his student teaching at nearby Decorah High School.


Francisco J. Nunez

Born in New York City of Dominican descent, Francisco J. Nunez is a composer, conductor, a leading figure in music education, and a visionary, whose strongly held ideas have resulted in the critical and popular success of the award-winning Young People's Chorus of New York City (YPC), a chorus of 250 young people from 8 through 18 of all ethnic, economic, and religious backgrounds. One of today's most sought-after youth choirs with celebrated performances on three continents, YPC is the resident chorus of both the 92nd Street Y and WNYC, New York Public Radio, the first and only resident radio choir of any New York City radio station. In addition, together with the New York City Department of Education, Mr. Nunez is bringing the YPC choral program to an additional 400+ children as part of the chorus's Satellite Schools program in five New York City schools. Mr. Nunez is often contacted by cities around the country for help in replicating the YPC success.


James ODonnell

James O'Donnell is among the leading British organists of his generation. While some might further define him as a church organist and choir director-roles he has fulfilled with the utmost commitment-he has been active on the concert stage both as an organist and conductor. His choice of repertory has been broad, taking in the music of Renaissance-era icons like Palestrina, Josquin Desprez, Victoria, Lassus, and Guerrero, as well as that of twentieth century masters like Stravinsky, Poulenc, Janacek, and Kodaly. As a conductor he has often worked with period-instrument ensembles such as the Hanover Band and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment; as a keyboard soloist or continuo player he has frequently appeared with the Gabrieli Consort and the King's Consort. O'Donnell has made more than 30 recordings for the British label Hyperion.


Matthew Oltman

Matthew Oltman, Music Director, joined Chanticleer in 1999 singing tenor with the ensemble. In 2004 he was appointed Assistant Music Director under Joseph Jennings and in 2009 took over artistic leadership of the company following Mr. Jenning's retirement. During his decade with the ensemble, Mr. Oltman appeared on twelve critically acclaimed recordings, toured extensively throughout North America, Europe and Asia, and led numerous workshops and masterclasses with choristers world-wide.

In March of 2010 he conducted over 450 high school choral and orchestral students from across the country in Chanticleer's first National Youth Choral Festival, The Singing Life, on the stage of Davies Symphony Hall. He is the editor of the Chanticleer choral series, published by Hinshaw Music and was deeply involved in the publication of Chanticleer's Silver Jubilee Anthology of Music and A Chanticleer Christmas Anthology.


Jerold D. Ottley

Jerold Don Ottley was the music director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir from 1974 to 1999. His duties with the choir included the preparation and performance of nearly thirteen hundred weekly radio and television broadcasts of Music and the Spoken Word. He also led the choir in more than thirty commercial recordings and more than twenty major tours, in addition to regular concerts in the choir's home in the Salt Lake City tabernacle.

Early in his career, Dr. Ottley was a teacher and conductor in the schools and churches of Salt Lake City. Just prior to his appointment with the Tabernacle Choir, he taught on the music faculty at the University of Utah and served as the assistant chair of the music department. Since his retirement, he has been involved in volunteer work for four years as administrator and teacher for the Mormon Tabernacle Choir Training School at Temple Square, as a Tabernacle Choir staff volunteer revising the choral library computer database, as artistic advisor to the Salt Lake Interfaith Roundtable, and as a lay bishop for a congregation of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. From 2005 to 2008, he directed the University Chorale at Brigham Young University-Hawaii, a LDS church-owned university in the town of Laie on Oahu's north shore.


Matthew Owens

Matthew Owens became Conductor of The Exon Singers in 1997. He has broadcast with them regularly on BBC Radios 3 & 4, given concerts throughout the country and directed the annual Exon Singers Festival in Devon. Under his direction, The Exon Singers has premiered a series of new works by, among others, Richard Allain, Grayston Ives and George Lloyd and recorded George Lloyd's Requiem on the Albany label. Most recently, the choir recorded the Victoria Vespers, which is the first of a series of recordings with Delphian Records.

Matthew Owens is also Organist and Master of the Choristers of Wells Cathedral, a post which he took up at the age of 33 in January 2005. He was previously Organist and Master of the Music at St Mary's Episcopal Cathedral, Edinburgh and Sub Organist of Manchester Cathedral.


Christopher Page

A philologist by training, a musicologist by proven merit, and a performer by deep instinct, Christopher Page integrates the various aspects of his professional life as a humanist in the best sense of the word. He once welcomed a reviewer's comment that described his book as "Social history illuminated by its interest in music as an essential part of human experience." Page's career in scholarly teaching and publication freely informs his life as a performer of medieval musics and vice versa; both contribute to his vibrant analyses of medieval thought, especially that concerning music and the experience of music in human society. Page's academic credentials include a bachelor's degree in English from Oxford University (1974) and a PhD. from the University of York (1981). While completing his dissertation on Anglo-Saxon verse forms, he began publishing articles on the history of musical instruments as seen in medieval texts and illuminations, as well as papers on performance practice. New College, Oxford, appointed him lecturer in Old and Middle English (1980-1985), followed by the University of Cambridge in 1985.


Alice Parker

Alice Parker received professional training successively as a composer, conductor and teacher. Her work is founded on the interaction of these fields, and their extension into writing, theorizing and mentoring. It is founded upon the conviction that music is first and foremost sound, and that a paper diagram is a very imperfect medium for its transmission.

Vocal sound comes from human throats, and is infinitely variable. An inner vision of those sounds is necessary before one can evoke them through composing or performance. She knows that wonderfully musical sounds can come from amateur as well as professional singers, from children as well as adults, and from churches, schools and family groups.


Alice Parker

Alice Parker received professional training successively as a composer, conductor and teacher. Her work is founded on the interaction of these fields, and their extension into writing, theorizing and mentoring. It is founded upon the conviction that music is first and foremost sound, and that a paper diagram is a very imperfect medium for its transmission.

Vocal sound comes from human throats, and is infinitely variable. An inner vision of those sounds is necessary before one can evoke them through composing or performance. She knows that wonderfully musical sounds can come from amateur as well as professional singers, from children as well as adults, and from churches, schools and family groups.


Stefan Parkman

Swedish conductor Stefan Parkman (b. 1952), began his musical career by singing in the Uppsala Cathedral Boys' Choir. At the Royal College of Music in Stockholm he studied singing, as well as choral conducting with Eric Ericson and orchestral conducting with Jorma Panula. He was director of the Boy's Choir at Uppsala Cathedral from 1974 to 1988, and conducter of the Royal Philharmonic Chorus in Stockholm from 1985 to 1993. Since 1983 he has been conducter of the Uppsala Chamber Choir. In 1988 he was appointed chief conducter of the Danish National Radio Choir, having been a regular guest since 1983. Stefan Parkman has conducted most of Scandinavia's symphony orchestras and ensembles. He performs regularly with the Swedish Radio Choir, and often works with Stockholm Opera and the Drottningholm Festival Opera and Ballet. As a freelance conducter Stefan Parkman appears with numerous ochestras and ensembles in Scandinavia, including the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and the Royal Opera in Stockholm. He regularly conducts the Swedish Radio Choir, the Rundfunkchor Berlin and the BBC Singers, teaches choral conducting at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm and gives master-classes in Scandinavia and elsewhere.


Elizabeth Patterson

Elizabeth C. Patterson has been director of Gloriae Dei Cantores since 1988, and under her inspired leadership, the choir has achieved musical expertise and international renown. In Tune commended her for "genius in selecting just the right tempos and dynamics...serious, winning and convincing." Commenting on her conducting, the New York Times noted "clear commitment to rigorous training by the choir's conductor, Elizabeth Patterson."

Elizabeth C. Patterson's extensive experience as a music educator, coupled with her gifts as an interpreter of great intelligence and depth, have contributed greatly to the choir's accomplishments over the past decade, and as stated by Musical Opinion, "the music's deeply spiritual quality comes across with great force." Patterson has also gained recognition for her extensive contribution in the interest of Gregorian chant, by performance of chant in concert with Gloriae Dei Cantores, and by authoring a book on chant, The Sound Eternal.


Sharon J. Paul

Sharon J. Paul is an professor of music, chair of vocal and choral studies, and director of choral activities at the University of Oregon. She earned her D.M.A. in choral conducting from Stanford University, an M.F.A. in conducting and performance practice from UCLA, and a B.A. in music from Pomona College.

From 1984-1992, Paul served as director of choral activities at California State University, Chico, where she directed a large choral program and taught undergraduate and graduate courses in conducting, choral literature, and the humanities. In 1991 Paul was awarded the Outstanding Teacher Award at CSU, Chico.


Daniel Paulson

Daniel Paulson, holds a Bachelor of Music degree in voice performance from Sacramento State University, and a Masters of Music Degree in Choral Conducting from the Three-Summer Masters of Music degree program at California State University, Los Angeles.

Hailed as an "astute programmer" and a conductor who can "coax urbane performances from his singers," Daniel has been a featured conductor on the International Festival of New American Music in Sacramento, CA, the Old First Concert Series in San Francisco, CA, the Northern Zone Music Educators Association's High School Honor Choir in Nevada, CA, and the American Choral Directors Association's 2011 National Convention in Chicago, IL. He is a student of Dr. William Belan, Professor Emeritus of Choral Studies at California State University, Los Angeles, and Donald Brinegar, Professor Emeritus of Choral Studies at Pasadena City College and adjunct Professor of Graduate Choral Conducting at the University of Southern California.


Sandra Peter

Dr. Sandra Peter is an Assistant Professor of Music at Luther College, Decorah, Iowa, where she directs Cathedral Choir (100 sophomores, mixed voices) and Aurora (100 first-year women). She also teaches introductory and advanced choral conducting.

In demand as a choral clinician and guest conductor, she has led All-State and honor choirs throughout the United States. Dr. Peter also conducted the Concert Choir and Bach Cantata Choir and Orchestra of the 2009 Lutheran Summer Music Academy. 2010 engagements included the Northwest-ACDA High School Women's Honor Choir, the Mississippi All-State Women's Choir, clinics and presentations in Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, New Mexico, New York and Wisconsin, and a performance with Cathedral Choir at the NC-ACDA conference in Minneapolis. During the 2010-11 year she is completing a book entitled Making connections: core principles for choral conductors.


Dr. Timothy Peter

Dr. Timothy Peter, head of the music department and professor of music at Luther College, conducts the Collegiate Chorale, a 90-voice select Junior-Senior choral ensemble and Luther's first-year 90-voice men's choir, Norsemen. After growing up on a farm in Minnesota, Peter received his undergraduate degree from Luther College, working with Weston Noble and completed the degree of Doctorate of Musical Arts from the University of Arizona, under the direction of Dr. Maurice Skones.

Previous to his appointment at Luther College in 1991, he was a high school choral director and church musician in Iowa and Arizona. Recently, he has been the state and divisional Repertoire and Standards chair for College and University Choirs for the American Choral Directors Association. His choirs have been selected to perform at three Divisional NC-ACDA conventions held in Minneapolis, Minn., Sioux Falls, S.D., and Madison, Wis. His off-campus teaching, adjudicating, and conducting includes numerous appearances as a convention presenter, festival clinician, and all-state conductor in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin. .


Peter Philips

Peter Phillips has made an impressive if unusual reputation for himself in dedicating his life's work to the research and performance of Renaissance polyphony. Having won a scholarship to Oxford in 1972, Peter Phillips studied Renaissance music with David Wulstan and Denis Arnold, and gained experience in conducting small vocal ensembles, already experimenting with the rarer parts of the repertoire.

He founded the Tallis Scholars in 1973, with whom he has now appeared in over 1600 concerts and made over 50 discs, encouraging interest in polyphony all over the world. As a result of his work, through concerts, recordings, magazine awards, publishing editions of the music and writing articles, Renaissance music has come to be accepted for the first time as part of the mainstream classical repertoire.


Simon Phipps

Simon Phipps was born in London and received his early musical training as a chorister at New College, Oxford. He took his B.A. as a Choral Scholar at King's College, Cambridge and went on to study singing at the Guildhall School in London. Conducting studies in Munich and Manchester followed and he made his professional debut at the Gothenburg Opera in 1985.

The next ten years were largely devoted to opera with engagements at Sadlers Wells and English National Opera in London, Krefeld in Germany, and Malmo in Sweden . In 1994 Simon Phipps moved to Sweden and has since then lived in Gothenburg. Although opera is still an important feature of his career (since 2003 he has been the Artistic Director of Lacko Opera Festival and in November 2005 he conducted the Scandinavian premiere of Britten's Paul Bunyan in Gothenburg) orchestral and choral work is now equally important.


Loren W. Ponten

Loren Ponten, Founder & Artistic Director of Opus 7 Vocal Ensemble, has been an active conductor in the Pacific Northwest for over 25 years. A champion of contemporary choral music, he and Opus 7 have commissioned over 25 new choral works, premiered countless works from around the world, the United States, and the Pacific Northwest and Seattle, as well as consistently included time-honored traditional repertoire in their programs.

Passionate about chamber choral music, Ponten formed Opus 7 in 1992 with 7 singers in order to perform a wide-range of music from madrigals to motets and jazz. Soon after founding the group, Ponten turned the group's focus to the performance of choral works by Northwest composers, and in 2000 instituted an annual Student Choral Composition Awards Program to encourage young composers to create new choral works and to contribute to the expansion of the choral repertoire.


Cynthia Powell

Cynthia Powell assumed the position of Artistic Director of the Stonewall Chorale in September, 2002. She has conducted choirs throughout the NY metropolitan area and currently serves as Music Director of West End Collegiate, NYC and Organist/ Choirmaster of Temple Sinai in Tenafly. As a pianist and organist, she toured the U.S. and Europe with Meredith Monk's opera ATLAS, and Monk's Celebration Service and Quarry at the Spoleto, USA Festival, the Walker Arts Center in Minneapolis and Lincoln Center. She has conducted Stonewall's collaborations with Meredith Monk at Merkin Hall and at the BAM Next Wave Festival in October 2009.

A graduate of Westminster Choir College, she has been a guest conductor at Sarah Lawrence College, the St. George's Choral Society in NYC and the International Choral Festival in Havana, Cuba. She has produced recitals and concerts to benefit Bailey House, the animals injured in the Exxon-Valdez disaster, and Doctors without Borders. Cynthia is also the conductor of Melodia Women's Choir of NYC.


Robert Prizeman

Robert Prizeman became choirmaster of the choir at St. Philip's Church (Norbury, South London) in 1970 at the age of 18. He has composed & arranged numerous works for the all boy choir 'Libera' including 'Voca Me'. He has been a musical advisor to the BBC in the UK working on programmes such as 'Songs of Praise' since 1985.

The young performers of Libera, who sing together at a church in South London, are recruited by Libera originator and writer, Robert Prizeman. They sing a wide range of music, including much from the classical cathedral repertoire, so they use the full range of their voices. Libera is not children's music, even though the average age of the singers may be 12.


Elaine Quilichini

Elaine Quilichini is recognized internationally for her exceptional musicianship and distinguished work. As a Master of Music (Kodaly), she has served as a clinician, lecturer, adjudicator and guest conductor across Canada, the United States, Australia, Japan, Argentina and the Canary Islands.

In 1995, Ms. Quilichini founded the Calgary Girls Choir, and with her vision and passion has built it into one of the most celebrated choirs in the world. Ms. Quilichini conducted the University of Calgary Women's Choir for over ten years and continues to lead an active music studio. A notable indication of Ms. Quilichini's stature in the choral community is her successful choral series published by Alliance Music Publishing, Houston, Texas.

A recipient of the Alberta Choral Federation's 'con spirito' award for her contributions to the choral arts. In 2003 Ms. Quilichini made her debut as maestro at Carnegie Hall with the Calgary Girls Choir directing the choral concert A Tribute to Peace and Freedom.


Dr. Linda Raney

Dr. Linda Raney has been music director of the Women's Ensemble since 1988. Indiana University provided her an excellent musical education, and she received a doctorate, as well as master's and bachelor's degrees, from that famous institution. Since graduation she has also studied with many inspiring teachers in master classes, most recently Jerry Blackstone, Mack Wilberg and Craig Jessop. This year she received a Santa Fe Mayor's Recognition Award for Excellence in the Arts.

also prepares the Santa Fe Symphony Chorus for performances with the Santa Fe Symphony. Their 2010-2011 season's repertory includes Handel's Messiah, Cherubini's Requiem, Holst's The Planets and Debussy's Nocturnes.


Doreen Rao

Doreen Rao's distinguished career as conductor and master teacher links the standards of professional performance with the goals of music education. Celebrated for her spirited and moving concerts, Rao's commitment to choral music is recognized in her innovative programming, teaching initiatives, worldwide conducting appearances, and her award-winning Choral Music Experience publications with Boosey & Hawkes.

Appointed Music Director and Conductor of the Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus in 2008, Rao holds the Cameron Baird Conductor's Chair working in close collaboration with the Grammy Award winning Maestro JoAnn Falletta and the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra. In this position, Rao leads the newly inaugurated Buffalo Sings! Community Concert Series dedicated to building bridges between artists and their audiences through concert performances and educational programs throughout Western New York.

Doreen Rao holds the University of Toronto's Elmer Iseler Chair in Conducting Emeritus. As Director of Choral Programs, she established and led the Faculty of Music's Graduate Program in Conducting, she directed the Toronto Bach Festival in collaboration with its principal guest artist, the eminent Bach scholar and conductor Helmuth Rilling, and she conducted the award-winning University of Toronto MacMillan Singers and Bach Festival Singers. Her choirs collaborated regularly with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, under conductors Peter Oundjian, Gianandrea Noseda, Bernard Labadie and Helmuth Rilling.


Buryl Red

Buryl Red, described by The Washington Post as "uncommonly creative", the musical work of Buryl Red as composer, conductor, producer, and arranger, may be experienced in such diverse venues as Carnegie Hall, Saturday Night Live, and thousands of schools, churches, and theaters around the world. His output includes more than sixteen hundred published compositions and arrangements, production of over 2500 recordings,< and the musical supervision, composition, and arranging for several hundred shows, documentaries, and musical specials for network and cable television. Several of his choral works including Celebrate Life and the first performing edition of Pergolesi's Magnificat are considered landmarks in their fields. He is the executive record producer for some of the most widely used music textbooks in the United States including the new Silver Burdett Making Music series. Born in Little Rock, Arkansas, Buryl Red is a graduate of the music schools of Baylor University and Yale University and now lives in New York City. He has been honored with many civic and professional awards and degrees. He is particularly honored with the inclusion of his well-known song, "In Remembrance", in The African-American Heritage Hymnal published in 2001.


Helmuth Rilling

Helmuth Rilling (born 29 May 1933 in Stuttgart) is an internationally known German choral conductor, founder of the Gachinger Kantorei (1954), the Bach-Collegium Stuttgart (1965), the Oregon Bach Festival (1970),(1) the Internationale Bachakademie Stuttgart (1981) and other Bach Academies worldwide, and the "Festival Ensemble Stuttgart" (2001).

Rilling was born into a musical family. He received his early training at the Protestant Seminaries in Wurttemberg. From 1952 to 1955 he studied organ, composition, and choral conducting at the Stuttgart College of Music. He completed his studies with Fernando Germani in Rome and at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena.


Juan Pedro Rivera

Composer, teacher and conductor, Juan Pedro Gaffney Rivera has been researching, editing, teaching and performing the choral music of Latin America, Spain and Portugal for the past 35 years. He received early choral training from local maestros Herbert Bergman, Leonard Fitzpatrick, Richard Irven Purvis, Sergei Konstantinov and Waldemar Jacobsen, later earning advanced degrees in music from the University of California at Berkeley and Stanford University. His discovery of the classical and folk repertories of Latin America while working in Venezuela in the mid-60's proved key in determining the path of his career. In 1975 he founded the Coro Hispano de San Francisco and Conjunto Nuevo Mundo, and conjointly, the Instituto Pro Musica's Musicological Research Program, through which he has transcribed and/or edited more than 100 works by New World Renaissance and Baroque masters. Maestro Gaffney also serves as Director of Hispanic Liturgy at the Basilica of Mission San Francisco de Asis.


Earl Rivers

CCM's graduate conducting program has been recognized by U.S. News and World Report as among the top five in the U.S.A. CCM's Choral Program was the recipient of the Dale Warland Singers Score Library and Archives and recently hosted the winter 2010 Central Division convention of the American Choral Directors Association (ACDA) and the fall 2008 second national conference of the National Collegiate Choral Organization (NCCO).

Music Director and Conductor for twenty seasons from 1988-2008 of the Vocal Arts Ensemble of Cincinnati (VAE), a professional chamber choir, Rivers and the VAE received two ASCAP-Chorus America Awards for "Adventuresome Programming of Contemporary Music."

Rivers has conducted CCM's choral and orchestral forces in acclaimed university and regional premieres of John Adams's On the Transmigration of Souls, Philip Glass's Symphony No. 5, Tan Dun's Water Passion after St. Matthew, Krzysztof Penderecki's Credo and Augusta Read Thomas's Ring Out, Wild Bells, To The Wild Sky.


Ian Robertson

IAN ROBERTSON has been Chorus Director and Conductor with the San Francisco Opera since 1987 and Artistic Director of the San Francisco Boys Chorus since 1996. He made his San Francisco Opera conducting debut with the 1988 production of Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, and has since led performances of Falstaff, Lohengrin, Rigoletto, La Traviata, Don Carlo, Turandot, Il Trovatore and La Boheme . In addition to his highly praised work with the Opera Chorus, he has led the Opera Orchestra and Chorus in many concerts. Additional conducting assignments include the San Francisco Opera Center's presentations of The Italian Girl in Algiers, Cosi fan tutte, La Perichole and The Elixir of Love and the Merola Opera Program's Grand Finale Concerts at Davies Symphony Hall. He has led Don Giovanni for Sarasota Opera, Florida and The Magic Flute and Rigoletto for Edmonton Opera and has conducted La Rondine, Iolanta, The Rape of Lucretia, Eugene Onegin and Don Giovanni for the Curtis Opera Theatre in Philadelphia. This summer, Robertson again conducted the MOP Grand Finale Concert and has appeared as guest conductor with the Carmel Bach Festival. He will conduct A Midsummer Night's Dream for Curtis Opera Theatre.


Christopher Robinson

Christopher Robinson has rightly earned the reputation as one of the leading English choral conductors from the second half of the 20th century. While he has been closely identified with sacred music, he has also delved extensively into secular works. His repertory ranges from Baroque to contemporary, but with a decided slant toward 20th century British music. The names Elgar, Britten, Tippett, Maxwell Davies, Berkeley, Howells, Rubbra, Tavener, Walton, and a spate of other 20th century British composers occupy a good portion of his concert programs. That said, Robinson is also a master interpreter of the choral music of Haydn, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Durufle, Rachmaninov, Poulenc, Messiaen, and many other non-British composers. Robinson, who often held the dual post of organist and choirmaster, has also drawn lavish praise for his skills on the organ. He has appeared on more than 50 recordings, mostly as conductor, with a few as organist (Saint-Saens' Organ Symphony, for example) and a handful serving in both roles. His recordings are available on numerous labels, including Naxos, Chandos, Brilliant Classics, Hyperion, Nimbus, EMI, Regis, and Guild.


Dr. Russell L. Robinson

Dr. Russell L. Robinson has been on the faculty at the University of Florida since 1984, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in choral and music education and is Professor of Music and Chair of the Music Education department. Highly in demand, Dr. Robinson has made over 300 appearances as a conductor, speaker and presenter at festivals, workshops, honor choirs, all-state choirs and state, regional, national and international conferences in the US, Europe, Asia, Africa, Central America, and Australia as well as conducting venues, which include: Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center, Boston's Symphony Hall, the White House, Washington's National Cathedral and the Wiesbaden, Germany Kurhaus. He is a past President of the Florida Music Educators Association, Interim Associate Dean of the UF College of Fine Arts, National Collegiate Chair for the Music Educators National Conference (MENC) and MENC Choral Adviser. Dr. Robinson is a published author, composer and arranger with over 200 publications in print, including choral compositions, arrangements, articles, books, and instructional DVD's


Dr. James Rodde

James Rodde, the Moen Endowed Chair in Music at Iowa State, conducts the Singers, the 150-voice Statesmen men's choir, and teaches choral conducting and literature. His choirs have toured internationally and have been honored with performances at distinguished music events, including the 1993, 1997, 2005, and 2009 ACDA, and 2008 NCCO National Conventions.

An active clinician and conducting mentor, he has led numerous festival ensembles, including a number of All-State and ACDA divisional honor choirs. In 2005 one of his students won the ACDA National Undergraduate Conducting Competition. Dr. Rodde is also the Artistic Director of two community ensembles, the Ames Chamber Artists and Des Moines Choral Society. From 1985 to 2000 he served at the University of North Dakota, where he was honored with the Fine Arts Faculty Award for Teaching.


Bruce Rogers

Professor Bruce Rogers is the Director of Choral Activities at Mt. San Antonio College, a position he assumed in 1994. In this role, he oversees the department's various vocal and choral programs, which span the entire spectrum of music - from classical to jazz. He personally directs Mt. San Antonio College's award-winning Chamber Singers and the elite vocal jazz ensemble, Singcopation.

Choirs under his direction have won numerous awards and first place honors throughout the United States and Europe. Mr. Rogers' choirs have had the honor of performing at five California State Conventions, seven American Choral Directors Association (ACDA) Regional and National Conventions as well as performing at three International Association of Jazz Educators (IAJE) National Conventions. They have achieved top ranking in national and international competitions throughout the world, including performances in Concert Halls throughout the United States, Canada, Scotland, Wales, England, France, Italy, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Bulgaria and the Czech Republic.


Catherine Roma

Catherine Roma became one of the founding mothers of the women's choral movement, an international network of over 70 women's choruses, when she started Anna Crusis Women's Choir in her native Philadelphia in 1975. She began MUSE in 1984 after coming to Ohio to do graduate work at the University of Cincinnati's College-Conservatory of Music where she completed her Doctor of Musical Arts Degree in 1989. Catherine is currently Professor of Music at Wilmington College. Through her association at Wilmington, Catherine founded and directs UMOJA Men's Chorus at Warren Correctional Institution, in Lebanon, Ohio.

She is Minister of Music at St. John's Unitarian Universalist Church in Cincinnati, and is co-founder and director of the Martin Luther King Coalition Chorale. Recent honors include the Jane Schlissman Award for Outstanding Contributions to Women's Music (1993), Race Relations Recognition Award (1999), the GALA Legacy Award (2000), the Maurice McCracken Award (2000), the Cincinnati Leading Woman Award, Arts/Entertainment category (2001), the Image Maker Award (2002), the Enduring Spirit Award (2003), the Community Service Award from the Council of Christian Communions (2004), and the Governor's Award for the Arts, in the category Community Development & Participation (2008).


Catherine Roma

Catherine Roma became one of the founding mothers of the women's choral movement, an international network of over 70 women's choruses, when she started Anna Crusis Women's Choir in her native Philadelphia in 1975. She began MUSE in 1984 after coming to Ohio to do graduate work at the University of Cincinnati's College-Conservatory of Music where she completed her Doctor of Musical Arts Degree in 1989. Catherine is currently Professor of Music at Wilmington College. Through her association at Wilmington, Catherine founded and directs UMOJA Men's Chorus at Warren Correctional Institution, in Lebanon, Ohio.

She is Minister of Music at St. John's Unitarian Universalist Church in Cincinnati, and is co-founder and director of the Martin Luther King Coalition Chorale. Recent honors include the Jane Schlissman Award for Outstanding Contributions to Women's Music (1993), Race Relations Recognition Award (1999), the GALA Legacy Award (2000), the Maurice McCracken Award (2000), the Cincinnati Leading Woman Award, Arts/Entertainment category (2001), the Image Maker Award (2002), the Enduring Spirit Award (2003), the Community Service Award from the Council of Christian Communions (2004), and the Governor's Award for the Arts, in the category Community Development & Participation (2008).


Rebecca J. Rottsolk

Rebecca J. Rottsolk served as Artistic Director of the internationally renowned Northwest Girlchoir in Seattle, Washington from 1982 to 2001. Under her leadership, the Choir's outstanding repertoire, creative and varied performances, and professional recordings were so successful that they won accolades from and became a model for other choirs and music educators. She and her choirs have won numerous awards in North America and abroad.

As an accomplished soprano, respected conductor and music educator, Rebecca frequently presents workshops on treble voices and effective teaching and conducting techniques. She serves as guest conductor and clinician for numerous festival choruses throughout America, adjudicates for Heritage Festivals and Worlds of Fun Choral Festivals, and is a series editor for Alliance Music Publications, Inc. She served on the 2001 National Endowment of the Arts review panel for ArtsLearning applications.


Peter Rutenberg

In 2007-08, Peter Rutenberg begins both his 18th season as music director of Los Angeles Chamber Singers & Cappella and his 39th in the choral arts. Rutenberg has produced radio and records for over two decades. He is president of RCM records, a Grammy-winning conductor and producer of Padilla: Sun of Justice, and producer of the Los Angeles Master Chorale's Grammy-nominated Lauridsen Lux Aeterna CD. He is also a composer of concert, radio, and television music, and has served as master teacher and clinician for various choral music festivals in Southern California, as well as for residencies at UCLA and UC Riverside. As Director of Programming & Production for KUSC, and beginning with the 1984 Olympic Arts Festival, Rutenberg covered every major festival and arts organization in Los Angeles for the balance of the decade. Under his artistic direction, Chorus America's radio series The First Art won the ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award for Broadcasting in 1995. Rutenberg joined the faculty of the UCLA Music Department in 2006.


Paris Rutherford

Paris Rutherford, now in retirement from the University of North Texas, is Regents Professor Emeritus in Jazz Studies. During his tenure, he organized and developed the degree programs in Vocal Jazz Studies and in Jazz Arranging. For over thirty years, Rutherford directed the award-winning UNT Jazz Singers both in performance and in the recording studios. He also directed the premiere North Texas Vocal Jazz Summer Workshop from its inception.

Over the years, his jazz arranging students have been heard on recordings by the One, Two and Three O'Clock Lab Bands, the UNT Jazz Singers, and too many personal CD projects to name. Many have continued their writing at a professional level, both in the recording studios and for stage and show productions.

A sought-after clinician in vocal jazz, Rutherford has over one hundred vocal jazz arrangements in publication by Hal Leonard, Sound Music Publishing, UNC Jazz Press, and recently through Artist Share by Maria Schneider. He is also a member of the Board of Directors for the newly formed Jazz Education Network.


John Rutter

John Rutter's compositional career has embraced both large and small-scale choral works, orchestral and instrumental pieces, a piano concerto, two children's operas, music for television, and specialist writing for such groups as the Philip Jones Brass Ensemble and the King's Singers. His most recent larger choral works, Requiem (1985), Magnificat (1990) and Psalmfest (1993) have been performed many times in Britain, North America, and a growing number of other countries. He co-edited four volumes in the Carols for Choirs series with Sir David Willcocks, and, more recently, has edited the first two volumes in the new Oxford Choral Classics series, Opera Choruses (1995) and European Sacred Music (1996).


Paul Salamunovich

Paul Salamunovich is in his final season as director of music at St. Charles Borromeo Church in North Hollywood, California. Under his direction, the choir has risen to preeminence among American church choirs. Salamunovich has been recognized for his contributions to sacred music with a Papal Knighthood in the Order of St. Gregory. His career has been marked by the highest achievements in professional, educational and liturgical music. He conducted the choruses at Loyola Marymount University for 27 years, was music director of the Los Angeles Master Chorale for ten years, and guest conductor throughout the United States, Canada, the Bahamas, South America, Europe, Australia, and the Far East. He has conducted choral segments for such movie soundtracks as First Knight, A.I., Air Force One, Snow Falling on Cedar, and Independence Day. Salamunovich has been honored by ACDA for lifetime achievements at the state, division, and national levels.


Steven Sametz

Steven Sametz has earned increasing renown in recent years as both composer and conductor. He is the Ronald J. Ulrich Professor of Music and director of Lehigh University Choral Arts, one of the country's premiere choral programs. He also serves as Artistic Director for the elite a cappella ensemble, The Princeton Singers and is the founding director of The Lehigh University Choral Composer Forum, a summer course of study designed to mentor emerging choral composers.

Recent guest conducting appearances include the Taipei Philharmonic Foundation, the Berkshire Music Festival, the New York Chamber Symphony, and the Netherlands Radio Choir. Dr. Sametz' compositions have been heard throughout the world at the Tanglewood, Ravinia, Salzburg, Schleswig-Holstein, and Santa Fe music festivals. His in time of appears on the recent Grammy award-winning CD by Chanticleer, "Colors of Love," and his work may be heard on six other Chanticleer CDs.


Steven Sametz

Steven Sametz has earned increasing renown in recent years as both composer and conductor. He is the Ronald J. Ulrich Professor of Music and director of Lehigh University Choral Arts, one of the country's premiere choral programs. He also serves as Artistic Director for the elite a cappella ensemble, The Princeton Singers and is the founding director of The Lehigh University Choral Composer Forum, a summer course of study designed to mentor emerging choral composers.

Recent guest conducting appearances include the Taipei Philharmonic Foundation, the Berkshire Music Festival, the New York Chamber Symphony, and the Netherlands Radio Choir. Dr. Sametz' compositions have been heard throughout the world at the Tanglewood, Ravinia, Salzburg, Schleswig-Holstein, and Santa Fe music festivals. His in time of appears on the recent Grammy award-winning CD by Chanticleer, "Colors of Love," and his work may be heard on six other Chanticleer CDs.


Jo-Michael Scheibe

Jo-Michael Scheibe chairs the Thornton School of Music's Department of Choral and Sacred Music at the University of Southern California, where he conducts the USC Chamber Singers, teaches choral conducting and choral methods, and supervises the graduate and undergraduate choral program. In 2008, he assumed a new post as National President Elect of the American Choral Directors' Association.

No stranger to the ACDA, Scheibe previously served as the organization's Western Division President (1991-1993), as well as National Repertoire and Standards Chairperson for Community Colleges (1980-1989). Ensembles under his leadership have sung at six national ACDA conventions (1985, 1991, 1993, 1997, 2003, 2007), as well as two national conventions of the Music Educators National Conference (1996, 2000), and various regional and state conventions.


Jo-Michael Scheibe

Jo-Michael Scheibe chairs the Thornton School of Music's Department of Choral and Sacred Music at the University of Southern California, where he conducts the USC Chamber Singers, teaches choral conducting and choral methods, and supervises the graduate and undergraduate choral program. In 2008, he assumed a new post as National President Elect of the American Choral Directors' Association.

No stranger to the ACDA, Scheibe previously served as the organization's Western Division President (1991-1993), as well as National Repertoire and Standards Chairperson for Community Colleges (1980-1989). Ensembles under his leadership have sung at six national ACDA conventions (1985, 1991, 1993, 1997, 2003, 2007), as well as two national conventions of the Music Educators National Conference (1996, 2000), and various regional and state conventions.


Robert Scholz

Born in Chicago, and educated in the Lutheran School system there, Robert Scholz sang in school choirs and was inspired to become a choral director by the example of Gerhard Schroth. He studied piano beginning at age eight, and later took up organ. As a student at St. Olaf College from 1957-1961 he sang under Olaf Christiansen and Kenneth Jennings, and studied voice and piano.

He continued his education at the University of Illinois where he earned a Master of Music degree in musicology in 1967 and a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting in 1969. While at Illinois, Scholz conducted the University Chamber Choir and was Minister of Music at First United Presbyterian Church of Urbana.


Gary R. Schwartzhoff

Gary R. Schwartzhoff is Professor of Music and Director of Choral Activities at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire where he conducts Concert Choir, Chamber Choir, The Singing Statesmen and teaches conducting. Schwartzhoff received his Bachelor of Arts Degree from Central College in Pella, Iowa and a Master of Music Degree in Choral Conducting from the University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa. A recipient of the Helen Kemper Doctoral Fellowship Award, he received a Doctor of Musical Arts Degree in Conducting at the University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri, where he studied conducting with Dr. Eph Ehly.

Schwartzhoff has been active throughout his professional career in the American Choral Directors Association (ACDA) where he served as President of the North Central Division from 1992-94. In 2010, the Wisconsin Choral Directors Association (WCDA) bestowed the Morris Hayes Award to Schwartzhoff for lifetime achievement in the choral art.


Dr. Timothy Seelig

Tim Seelig has been making music as a conductor, singer, teacher for 35 years. He is currently the Director of Art for Peace & Justice, Artistic Director in Residence for GALA Choruses and on the adjunct music faculty Southern Methodist University's Meadows School of the Arts since 1996. In addition, he continues an extremely busy guest conducting schedule throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe. His the Conductor Emeritus of the Turtle Creek Chorale which he conducted for 20 years.

Dr. Seelig holds four degrees, including the DMA from the University of North Texas and the Diploma from the Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria. He has three books and two DVDs on choral technique including the best-sellers The Perfect Blend and The Perfect Rehearsal, and the brand new The Perfect Choral Workbook. The fourth book, Quick Choral Fixes will be on sale in February, 2009.


Dr. Tim Sharp

Tim Sharp is Executive Director of the American Choral Directors Association. An active choral conductor as well as writer, Dr. Sharp came to ACDA from Rhodes College, Memphis, TN, where he conducted the Rhodes Singers and MasterSingers Chorale. Before his appointment at Rhodes, he was Director of Choral Activities at Belmont University in Nashville, TN.

Dr. Sharp's research and writing focuses pedagogically in conducting and score analysis as evidenced by his publications Precision Conducting, Achieving Choral Blend and Balance, and Up Front! Becoming the Complete Choral Conductor. Dr. Sharp has served ACDA in many capacities, including conducting state honor choirs, as a Choral Journal Editorial Board member, and as a member of ACDA's Research and Publications Committee.


Dr. Tim Sharp

Tim Sharp is Executive Director of the American Choral Directors Association. An active choral conductor as well as writer, Dr. Sharp came to ACDA from Rhodes College, Memphis, TN, where he conducted the Rhodes Singers and MasterSingers Chorale. Before his appointment at Rhodes, he was Director of Choral Activities at Belmont University in Nashville, TN.

Dr. Sharp's research and writing focuses pedagogically in conducting and score analysis as evidenced by his publications Precision Conducting, Achieving Choral Blend and Balance, and Up Front! Becoming the Complete Choral Conductor. Dr. Sharp has served ACDA in many capacities, including conducting state honor choirs, as a Choral Journal Editorial Board member, and as a member of ACDA's Research and Publications Committee.


Martha Shaw

Dr. Martha Shaw. Lester Harbin Chair of Conducting, is Professor of Music and Director of Choral Activities. She joined the faculty in 1999. Her fifteen years of experience as a public school music specialist contribute significantly to her work at Shorter where she teaches music education methods classes, supervises student teachers, and conducts the Shorter Chorale.

Dr. Shaw is the founding director of the Spivey Hall Children's Choir. Under her direction, the choir has been featured in performances for state, regional, and national conventions of the American Choral Directors Association and on NPR's "Performance Today" and "From the Top." Dr. Shaw continues to work extensively as a clinician and guest conductor.


Robert Shaw

The late Robert Shaw, called "the Dean of American choral conductors," died in January, 1999. His long and fruitful relationship with Telarc International spanned twenty years and produced 41 recordings, eleven of which have won Grammy Awards.

Shaw became Music Director Emeritus and Conductor Laureate of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra in 1988 after serving as Music Director of the Orchestra for 21 years. During his tenure as Music Director, he built the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra into a major American orchestra, garnering widespread acclaim through national and international tours and award-winning recordings.

A regular guest conductor of major orchestras in this country and abroad, Mr. Shaw was also in demand as a teacher and lecturer at leading U. S. colleges and universities. The Robert Shaw Institute was founded in recent years to foster excellence in music-making, especially in the choral arts. Now affiliated with Ohio State University, the Institute's summer festivals in southwest France and the U.S. attracted admiring attention from the international press and produced a number of recordings from the Robert Shaw Festival Singers.

Choral Music - Home

All Choral Groups | Choral Christmas | Composers | Choral Directors | Choral arrangements

Mixed Voice Groups | Mixed Voice CDs | Mixed Childrens Choirs | Mixed Childrens CDs | Mixed Voice Christmas CDs

Male Choral Groups | Male Choral CDs | Boyschoirs | Boyschoirs CDs | Male Choral Christmas CDs

Womens Choral Groups | Womens Choral CDs | Girls Choirs | Girls Choirs CDs | Female Choral Christmas CDs

Early Music Groups | Early Music CDs | Early Music Christmas CDs

Spirituals | Church Choirs | Madrigals | Choral DVDs | Complete choral list

Choral Development - Home | Choral Conducting | Techniques & Methods | Warm-Ups & Exercises | Rehearsal

Choral Choreography | Instructional DVDs | Children's Choir Development | Pedagogy | Singers Resources | Director Resourses

Choral music by Country - America | England | Canada | Bulgaria | Hungary | Germany | Estonia

Latvia | Russia | Denmark | Netherlands | Sweden | Africa | Latin American