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Richard Greene: Low? Bottom? Me?

Too Cool To Care!
Nobody's Perfect
Searching for Poetry
Let's Go Wild
Growing Roses
Helter Skelter
The Waters of March
Tricotism
Everything Happens for a Reason
Doin' the New Low-Down

"Low? Bottom? Me?" (Lobotomy, get it?) is Richard Bob Greene's first solo CD, and it was recorded live in "living rooms, hallways and kitchens in Berkeley, San Francisco, San Carlos, Alameda, and Pleasant Hill, CA, Seattle and Scotland, using an Apple ibook and Emagic Logic Audio." Richard is, of course a founder and driving force behind nu-wave a cappella pioneers The Bobs, and he's a songwriter, composer, arranger and humorist extraordinaire. Included on the 10 songs are 5 Greene originals, "Too Cool to Care," "Nobody's Perfect," Searchin' for Poetry," "Growing Roses" and "Let's Go Wild." The others are a manic remake of the Bob's cover of Lennon/McCartney's "Helter Skelter," Antonio Carlos Jobim's Salsa-flavored "The Waters of March," Oscar Pettiford's "Tricotism," and the Mills Brothers' "Doin' the New Low Down." Most of the songs on "Low?" are accompanied, but the emphasis is on the lyrics and on Greene's powerful vocals; the solid rich bass that has anchored the Bobs for so many years. "Too Cool to Care" is a stream of consciousness beatnik coffee-house poem with cool jazz clarinet, bass and drums, as is "Let's Go Wild" but the words are sung rather than spoken. "Nobody's Perfect" is a bluesy, jazzy observation. There's some wonderful vocal horns on "Doin' the New Low Down." "Low?" is a smoky, Leonard Cohen-esque, surprising, poetic new direction for Greene's music, which will please present fans and surely earn him new ones!

Item code: 2301C | 1 CD | $14.98 |add item to cart
Contemporary | A Cappella | United States
Related: Male Contemporary CDs
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